csvkit: A Swiss Army Knife for Comma-Delimited Files

If you’ve ever stared into the abyss of a big, uncooperative comma-delimited text file, it won’t take long to appreciate the value and potential of csvkit.

csvkit is a Python-based Swiss Army knife of utilities for dealing with, as its documentation says, “the king of tabular file formats.” It lets you examine, fix, slice, transform and otherwise master text-based data files (and not only the comma-delimited variety, as its name implies, but tab-delimited and fixed-width as well). Christopher Groskopf, lead developer on the Knight News Challenge-winning Panda project and recently a member of the Chicago Tribune’s news apps team, is the primary coder and architect, but the code’s hosted on Github and has a growing list of contributors.

As of version 0.3.0, csvkit comprises 11 utilities. The documentation describes them well, so rather than rehash it, here are highlights of three of the utilities I found interesting during a recent test drive:
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Test Drive: Freebase Gridworks 1.1

Update, 11/10/2010: Since I originally reviewed Freebase Gridworks, it has been acquired by Google. It’s now called Google Refine, and version 2.0 has been released. Original post follows:

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Data journalists spend lots of time wrestling dirty data, so when I heard the News Applications team at the Chicago Tribune raving about the data-handling abilities of Freebase Gridworks, my interest was piqued. Anything that can lessen the pain of cleaning data is worth a closer look!

Freebase Gridworks is a Java-based app that runs locally in your web browser. The makers’ pitch describes it best:

… A power tool that allows you to load data, understand it, clean it up, reconcile it internally, augment it with data coming from Freebase, and optionally contribute your data to Freebase for others to use. All in the comfort and privacy of your own computer.

Installation is simple. I chose to load Gridworks on my Windows XP-based work laptop, although you can download Mac and Linux versions from the code page. I was up and running in about five minutes, which included loading a new version of Java. Once running, the opening screen looks like so (click for larger version):

You can open an existing project or create a new one by importing a data file — and Gridworks hints at its utility by providing options to parse delimited or non-delimited files, limit the import to specific rows, etc. For testing, I grabbed the Academic Libraries: 2008 Public Use Data file from the National Center for Education Statistics — a tab-delimited text file of about 4,100 rows.
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